March 28, 2012

A Conspiratorial Explanation for Wildland Fire

During my years of working in multi-ethnic Pueblo, Colorado, I always found the Italians to be fondest of conspiratorial thinking.

(The university, of course, with its churning leadership, provided an excellent hothouse for conspiracy theories.)

M. and I were there today, and we stopped in at our favorite liquor store, where the owner, in his raspy old-Italian-guy voice, commented on the dry, windy, weather, and the recent spate of local fires.

Then we moved to the Lower North Fork Fire, currently burning up in Jefferson County.

"Two people died, you know," he said, leaning closer across the counter. And promptly he began to share his theory, in which the fire's origin was connected with the deaths.

I started to say, "But. . . " and then shut up. Why discuss something prosaic like smoldering embers from a prescribed burn last week when you could spin a tale of murder and arson instead, a tale so much more satisfying to the soul?

4 comments:

Camera Trap Codger said...

They love a good plot, and often have a way of infusing drama into otherwise mundane events. I guess that explains their love of opera. I married an Italian American -- e adesso io capisco.

Chas Clifton said...

Yes, think what Verdi could have done with a forest fire.

There needs to be the Incident Commander (basso) who refuses to let people know what he is thinking. And a chorus of Hot Shots.

Reid Farmer said...

One of my co-workers is still under mandatory evacuation from her house because of the fire. Barring some crazy wind this week-end it doesn't appear to be in much danger

Reid Farmer said...

There needs to be the Incident Commander (basso) who refuses to let people know what he is thinking. And a chorus of Hot Shots.

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I think you should start working on the libretto!!